Nursing & Healthcare Directories on: The Nursefriendly
Nursing Shortages, Short Staffing, Mandatory Overtime
Nursing Burnout

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New:

Nurses face rising tide of violence; It's now a felony to assault a nurse, Sunday, November 27, 2011, Lauren Auty, RN, BSN, MJ:" "Call Security!" is a phrase that is too often yelled across a busy Emergency Room. It's a disruptive moment for any staff nurse, patient or family member who is involved. Violence in Emergency Departments is a hot topic due to the rising frequency of occurrences nationally. Everyone knows that you don't touch a cop or any 'man in uniform.' Even mouthing off to a cop will get you in trouble. That should never change. As a new mother, I am a believer in instilling a little fear along with manners. I don't want to have a "punk" for a child. Some people just missed these lessons growing up and everyone from the McDonalds server to nurses are paying for it. As an ER nurse for most of my career, I have become almost desensitized to the reality that violence in our workplace is becoming more frequent and just as common in the suburban hospitals as those in major cities. The explicatives mother f****w**** or bitch, or f-this and f-that are common language in an Emergency Room. As the nurse this language is directed at, you learn to walk away and control the patient with methods supported by your hospital."
http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/phillyrn/134572643.html

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Frazzled, Fried...Finished? A Guide to Help Nurses Find Balance: Joan C. Borgatti, RN, MEd:"It's quite possible that nursing is one of the most underrated and misunderstood professions. The public adores nurses, but they just don't 'get' that nursing is a complex and demanding profession that exacts a toll on every nurse who gives patient care his or her all. And surprisingly, I think that sometimes nurses don't get it either. Nurses don't get how extraordinary they are, or all they bring to their practice. Instead, they run at full speed trying to do all that's asked of them and then some. Here we sit, in the middle of a severe nursing shortage, as many exhausted and burned-out nurses struggle to make it from one shift to the next. Where did the idealism go? When did the hopes so many nurses started out with disappear? And more importantly, how can nurses find it again?"
http://www.booklocker.com/books/1659.html


Chart a Course Survey reveals nursing dissatisfactions-now, it's time to act for change, Nurseweek:"Has the AONE/NURSEWEEK survey about the national nursing shortage revealed anything different than what has been commonly expressed among most nurses? Not really, but it certainly confirms what is being discussed at the state and national levels. We know that the nursing shortage and resulting staffing problems have had a negative effect on the quality of patient care. The heavy workload is aggravated by much sicker patients with shorter lengths of stay and more experienced nurses leaving because of patient safety and work environment safety hazards. What is most exciting about this survey is that nurses really "like the profession of nursing." Nurses younger than 35 are even more likely than older nurses to say that they would recommend nursing as a career to a high school or college student. Even those who say they plan to leave nursing-as well as RNs who are not working as nurses-appear receptive to continuing in nursing if certain conditions are met. Chief among these conditions are better compensation and a better work environment, followed by better hours and higher status for nurses."
http://www.nurseweek.com/ednote/02/040802b.asp

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Listening to Nurses: Dissatisfaction and Burnout on the Job, American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO:""We tell the student nurses to run for their lives." Nurses may constitute the most dissatisfied professions in the United States today. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, slightly more than two-thirds of registered nurses (69.5 percent) reported being even "moderately satisfied" with their jobs.76 By contrast, 85 percent of workers in other industries and 90 percent of professional workers are satisfied with their jobs.77 A 1999 survey done by the Nursing Executive Center reported similarly troubling findings: 28 percent of RNs said they were either "somewhat" or "very dissatisfied" with their jobs; 51 percent were somewhat satisfied and only 21 percent were very satisfied. Reporting on recent changes in the industry, a whopping 51 percent of all RNs stated that they were less satisfied with their jobs than they had been just two years earlier.78"
American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO
1625 L Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-5687
Tel: 202-429-1000 TTY: 202-659-0446 FAX: 202-429-1293
http://www.afscme.org/una/sns06.htm

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Preparing for Battle: What YOU can do for YOU, Sicker patients, reduced staffing, longer hours, and increased responsibilities—by Deborah Lynne, RN, BSN:"As Registered Nurses, few of us think of the hospital we work in as a battlefield, or of ourselves as soldiers. But the truth is, there are more similarities than you might think. We show up for our shift each day, not knowing what challenges we might encounter. Our job requires us to be in the moment at all times, and to make split second decisions on the run. What we do or don't do can mean the difference between life and death. We often work under extreme stress, yet must remain calm and in control. Although there are others who function in a supportive capacity, we are the ones on the frontline."
Working Nurse, Working World Magazine
3600 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1526 Los Angeles, CA 90010
Tel:(213)385-4781, Fax:(213)385-3782, WorkingNurse@WorkingWorld.com
http://www.workingworld.com/magazine/viewarticle.asp?articleno=255&wn=1

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Nationwide stats predict trouble within the nursing profession, Medzilla, Inc.:"Nursing satisfaction surveys indicate more nurses will want to change careers. The ANA's Staffing Survey, February 6, 2001, showed that 75 percent of nurses surveyed feel the quality of nursing care at the facility in which they work has declined over the past two years, while 56 percent of nurses surveyed believe that the time they have available for patient care has decreased. In addition, more than 40 percent of nurses surveyed said they would not feel comfortable having a family member or someone close to them be cared for in the facility in which they work. And over 54 percent of nurse respondents would not recommend their profession to their children or their friends."
Press Inquiries: Michele Groutage
mgroutage@medzilla.com Phone: (360) 657 5681
http://www.medzilla.com/pressfeb02.html

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Department of Health and Human Services: Informal Caregiver "Burnout": Predictors And Prevention:"There are approximately 4.6 million elderly Americans in need of long-term care who do not live in nursing homes. Over 90% of them rely--often exclusively--on family members and other informal caregivers for help with basic "activities of daily living" (ADLs) such as bathing, dressing, eating, etc. and "instrumental activities of daily living" such as cooking, shopping, and house cleaning. A main theme of policy-oriented research on informal eldercare has been understanding "caregiver burnout"--why some family members choose to stop providing care. The aim is to identify interventions--such as increased access to paid helpers--that could sustain informal caregiving and prevent or postpone many nursing home placements."
http://aspe.hhs.gov/rn/rn05.htm

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Combat Strategies at the Burnout Battlefront:"I'm dedicating this column to a group of faithful readers who grapple, often on a daily basis, with personal and professional survival in the career combat zone - the folks, mostly women, of the nursing profession. And with the "managed scare" monster, like an invading army, scaring off patients and professionals, it's not just a downsizing climate on the frontlines...Today, for many health care professionals, it's downright "frightsizing." (And believe me, Newt Gingrich, notwithstanding your division of labor and gender guidelines, I'd be proud to be stationed in the trenches with any number of these feisty and foxy warriors.)"
http://www.stressdoc.com/combat_strategies_at_the_burnout.htm

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Critical challenge: Faced with job stress exacerbated by the shortage, specialty nurses–particulary critical care RNs–keep their focus, NurseWeek:"It's 6:30 p.m., half an hour shy of the end of a 12-hour ICU shift at Mercy Medical Center in Roseburg, Ore. Three nurses pore over charts, scan reports, click a keyboard and scurry across the room to empty a urine bag, adjust a hose, raise a bedside rail. Chronic illness dominates today's caseload: lung disease, acute post-cardiac arrest, bleeding ulcers. The seven-bed unit in a 126-bed hospital serves a town of about 20,000. "In a small, rural hospital like this, the ICU nurses have to be very generalist," said Rebecca Lethlean, RN. "We take care of them all."
NurseWeek Publishing
1156-C Aster Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94086
(800) 859-2091 Fax (408) 249-3756
http://www.nurseweek.com/news/features/01-08/critical.html

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Nurses around the world are among the least satisfied workers, and the problem is getting worse:"The reports revealed that just under 30 percent to more than 40 percent of nurses in all countries except Germany had high burnout scores on a standard burnout scale. Also, more than 3 in 10 nurses in England and Scotland and more than 2 in 10 in the United States planned on leaving their jobs within the next year. Only 30 to 40 percent of nurses said that there were enough registered nurses to provide high-quality care and enough staff to get the work done. Fewer than half of the nurses in each country reported that management in their hospitals was responsive to their concerns, provided opportunities for nurses to participate in decisions, and acknowledged nurses' contributions to patient care."
http://www.ahcpr.gov/research/aug01/801RA12.htm

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Caretaker Burnout: Supporting Families of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease:"A 45-year-old laborer lives with his aging mother, who has Alzheimer's disease. Recently, she has become increasingly agitated. She frequently awakens during the night and wanders, sometimes out of the house. She is easily led back to her bed, but 30 minutes later she's up again. The son fears if he weren't constantly vigilant, his mother could hurt herself, get lost or be run over by a car."
http://www.findarticles.com/cf_dls/m3225/7_60/57062694/p1/article.jhtml

Nursing Discussions:

NEW RN & Hate it already, Ultimatenurse.com:"I need some advice. I am a new RN of only 4months. I work on a cardiac step down floor in a michigan hospital. I have always wanted to be a nurse, ever since I was in 2nd grade. I knew there was a staffing shortage and that it would be hardwork. However I never thought 4 months after achieving my dream and starting my career I would already hate it. SInce I have started my job 9 nurses, on my floor alone, have quit. We constantly work short staffed and nurses are always calling in. I should also mention I work midnights. I love being a nurse and I am very disappointed at the way i feel. I don't want to leave nursing or the health profession but I don't know what to do. Everyday I go to work I am nervous and constantly feel that my license is in jepordy."
http://www.ultimatenurse.com/forum/f12/new-rn-hate-already-16332/

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Sunday, 16 January 2005: Self-Care: Why Is It So Hard?:"Although self-care activities should be common sense, "nurses often tend to put everyone else's needs ahead of their own [and are] so caught up in their professional life and its demands that they don't seem to have the time or energy to take care of themselves" (Swanson, 2004, p. 8). Some work environments actually seem to promote self-neglect. Such environments are recognizable by "hall talk," which goes something like this: "Oh, I'm just frantic this week; I have so many deadlines I couldn't accomplish them if I cloned myself 10 times.""I know what you mean, I haven't eaten dinner with my family once this week, and tonight will be no exception.""My work weeks typically average 55 to 60 hours, and I still can't seem to get on top of the demands."
http://www.rednova.com/news/display/?id=119442

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Monday, January 03, 2005: Arizona: Nursing grads face burnout as business shifts by Beth Cochran:"Twenty-five years ago, Donald Daien graduated summa cum laude from ASU's nursing college. With diploma in hand, the idealistic student ventured into the world to comfort sick people. "People are most important to me so I decided to do something to help others...and chose nursing because it afforded the most direct and continuous patient contact," Daien said. "I felt that I could really make a difference as a nurse." At first things went well. Daien worked at Arizona State Hospital, Phoenix Camelback Hospital, Maricopa Medical Center and St. Luke's Hospital, among others."
http://www.statepress.com/issues/2005/01/03/news/690721

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The Shortcut URL To This Section Is: http://www.nursefriendly.com/shortage/

See also:

National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc.:"The following narratives have been written by individual state boards of nursing regarding the significant activities in their respective states related to the nursing shortage. These excerpts do not provide a comprehensive update of the nurse shortage in these states or nationwide. The information is simply intended to share information among Member Boards."
National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc.
676 N. St. Clair Street Suite 550 Chicago, Illinois, 60611-2921
Telephone: (312) 787-6555. info@ncsbn.org
http://www.ncsbn.org/news/stateupdates_state_shortage.asp

Choose by State, Country: Africa, Australia's Nursing Shortage, Canada's Nursing Shortage, British, Great Britain's Nursing Shortage, Nursing & Healthcare Chatrooms, Discussion Boards, Staffing Discussion Boards

Choose by local nursing shortage news by state: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York State, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah State, Virginia, Washington State, Wyoming


2003 Nursing Shortage News Coverage

2002-2000 News On the Nursing Shortage

1999 News on The Nursing Shortage


Nursing Shortage Serious For Seniors, About.com:"As the population ages the impact of the nursing shortage will be even greater. There is a threat to the health of every older adult in the United States and Canada looming on the horizon. It is not a virus or new type of bacteria that is causing this threat. The threat to health is a result of the increasing shortage of nurses in both countries. Over the last couple of years there have been numerous stories in the press about the magnitude and causes of the shortage. So far solutions for this situation have been few. Additionally this nursing shortage will impact the oldest of citizens the most. Older adults use health care services at a higher rate than do younger people. Advances in medicine and improved nutrition and lifestyle have added years to the average life span. With this longer life comes higher needs for medical services, especially the services of professional nurses."
http://seniorhealth.about.com/cs/prevention/a/nurse_shortage.htm

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The Nurse/Patient Ratio by Genevieve M. Clavreul RN, Ph.D.:"The New Year heralds many things, and this year brings legislation mandating a patient/nurse ratio in California. But after the confetti stops falling, did we get what we want? We now have a panacea for thousands of nurses in California, however, the ratio really can’t be enforced. (At the writing of this article the companion bill for enforcement is stalled in the legislature, having been defeated at least once already). As my children are fond of saying, “why am I not surprised?” Having been a nurse for almost 30 years, most of those years spent in the NICU/PICU, I am used to working with a strict nurse/patient ratio. ICU’s and a few other areas of nursing have always been under the control of an “acuity” system. Actually, all nursing is supposed to be, but we all know this isn’t always the case. For this reason, I knew in my heart that legislating a nurse/patient ratio was probably an exercise in futility."
Working Nurse, Working World Magazine
3600 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1526 Los Angeles, CA 90010
Tel:(213)385-4781, Fax:(213)385-3782, WorkingNurse@WorkingWorld.com
http://www.workingworld.com/magazine/viewarticle.asp?articleno=254&wn=1

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Nursing: A Medical Emergency, and Opportunity, hits home by Ronald A. Reis and Karen F. Reis RN:"You’re an RN, and you’ve been at it, administering to the sick and wounded, for months, years, maybe even decades. You’ve got your hands full with 12-hour shifts, high turnover, an often less than supportive work environment, and a stressed-out health care system that is, in places, itself on life-support. What to do? How to keep going? How to make this job, career, meaningful again? How to get out of nursing what you went into it for? How to avoid adding to the national nursing shortage by short-circuiting your own involvement in a noble profession?"
Working Nurse, Working World Magazine
3600 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1526 Los Angeles, CA 90010
Tel:(213)385-4781, Fax:(213)385-3782, WorkingNurse@WorkingWorld.com
http://www.workingworld.com/magazine/viewarticle.asp?articleno=253&w

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Preparing for Battle: What YOU can do for YOU, Sicker patients, reduced staffing, longer hours, and increased responsibilities—by Deborah Lynne, RN, BSN:"As Registered Nurses, few of us think of the hospital we work in as a battlefield, or of ourselves as soldiers. But the truth is, there are more similarities than you might think. We show up for our shift each day, not knowing what challenges we might encounter. Our job requires us to be in the moment at all times, and to make split second decisions on the run. What we do or don’t do can mean the difference between life and death. We often work under extreme stress, yet must remain calm and in control. Although there are others who function in a supportive capacity, we are the ones on the frontline."
Working Nurse, Working World Magazine
3600 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1526 Los Angeles, CA 90010
Tel:(213)385-4781, Fax:(213)385-3782, WorkingNurse@WorkingWorld.com
http://www.workingworld.com/magazine/viewarticle.asp?articleno=255&wn=1

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Last updated by Andrew Lopez, RN on Wednesday, August 19, 2014


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