Nursing & Healthcare Directories on: The Nursefriendly
Nursing Shortages, Short Staffing, Mandatory Overtime
Pennsylvania State Nurses

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03/28/2005: Pennsylvania: Experts predict nursing shortage:"Editor's note: This story is the first in a two-day series examining the shortage of nurses predicted in Pennsylvania in the next five years and how local hospitals are addressing staffing issues.More students than ever are selecting nursing as a career, but the Pennsylvania Workforce Investment Board is still predicting a shortage of 17,000 nurses in the state by 2010. "This is the third shortage I've lived through," said Rebecca Amberosini, the chief nursing officer at Uniontown Hospital, the largest of the three hospitals in Fayette County."
http://www.heraldstandard.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=14230942&BRD=2280&PAG=461&dept_id=480247&rfi=6

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Monday, February 28, 2005: Pennsylvania: Dialysis nurse keeps patients upbeat:"Wisecracks fly freely between Bill Wareham and his patients at Allegheny Valley Dialysis Center. Wareham is a nurse at the center in the Heights Plaza Shopping Center, Harrison, and he keeps the banter coming. If you came in for treatment out of sorts, a few hours later, you will leave with a smile on your lips. He talks with one patient about politics. To another, baseball."
http://pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/trib/newssummary/s_308437.html

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February 7, 2003: Pennsylvania: Hospital lawyer: We want W-B General RNs back on job:"Ufberg said the nurses' arbitration proposal "came out of the blue" after both sides had spent "considerable time" going over the terms of a return to work agreement. "Not once during this time was there ever a discuss about arbitration. The concept of arbitration never surfaced," Ufberg said. "I find it particularly disheartening that they voted not to return to work." Ufberg said the hospital has been "trying very hard" to reach an agreement with the nurses. The hospital offered nurses a proposed return to work agreement that was a result of a joint discussion, he said. Prior correspondence from the nurses stated they were ready to return to work, he added."
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=6967348&BRD=2259&PAG=461&dept_id=455154&rfi=6

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January 28, 2003: Pennsylvania: Nursing career fair held:"With an increasingly dwindling supply of nurses in Pennsylvania and around the nation, Pitt is doing its part to try and satisfy the demand. On Monday, the Fourth Annual Career Fair for local nurses was held in the Victoria Building. The lobby was filled with booths from all over Pennsylvania and other states such as West Virginia and North Carolina. Attendees at the event said the nursing shortage that has been ever-present in the past few years seems to be a result of several things."
http://www.pittnews.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2003/01/28/3e360750b0f6f

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Sunday, January 26, 2003: Pennsylvania: 'We have to have more nurses':""Right now there are fewer older people, and more young people to take care of them," said Amy Stewart, president of Senior Solution, a private geriatric care agency in Easton. "As the baby boomers age, that is going to reverse." Part of the problem is a lack of interest among young women in nursing as a career. "There are a lot more options available to the traditionally female-dominated nursing work force than there were 30 years ago," said Paul Langevin, president of the Healthcare Association of New Jersey. And young men shy away from nursing as a career because it retains a feminine connotation."
http://www.nj.com/news/expresstimes/pa/index.ssf?/base/news-4/1043575494260760.xml

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January 24, 2003: Pennsylvania: Nursing degree program helps fill shortage:"Students in at least one Penn program do not have to worry about unemployment in today's economy. Those in Penn's Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Master of Science in Nursing accelerated program -- designed for those who already hold a bachelor's degree in another field -- have potential employers lining up. "We try to be as flexible as we can, as there is a nursing shortage," said Adam Sherr, associate director of Graduate Academic Affairs at the Nursing School and an adviser to several students in the BSN/MSN program."
http://www.dailypennsylvanian.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2003/01/24/3e30ef137d0b1

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January 24th, 2003: Nursing home operators also caught in Medicaid, insurance squeeze:"There are so many imbalances in the health care system, at a time when the needs are growing greater," Burns commented. With the demand for services increasing, Burns said the amount of nurses, certified nursing aides and nursing home administrators has been declining. "In the classified ads, there is a bidding war for a small pool of people," Burns noted. "Salaries of nurses are $20 to $25 an hour. Temporary agency nurses might charge $35 to $40 an hour. Sometimes, we need agency nurses because we don't have enough staff."
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=6800078&BRD=2259&PAG=461&dept_id=455154&rfi=6

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Thursday, January 23, 2003: Pennsylvania: Competing for caregivers:"Human resource administrators at St. Barnabas Health System don't need a psychic to tell them how much longer the nursing shortage that is hitting health care systems nationwide will last. But they thought one could help weather the three-year-old labor crunch, so they hired a palm reader for their "We See You in Our Future" job fair on Monday. "More and more in the last six months, facilities have been having job fairs that are more eye-catching and appealing," said Margaret Horton, personnel director at the Gibsonia-based health system. "We felt that if our competition was doing it, we needed to find ways to make it more interesting for applicants."
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/business/s_114239.html

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Tue, Jan. 21, 2003: Pennsylvania: Frustrated nurses often center new careers around health care:"It's a matter of loving the work, but hating the job. So says Pat Bemis, president and CEO of the National Nurses in Business Association, about nurses who become so disenchanted with the hospital setting that they're opting to start their own businesses. And the businesses nurses are starting are "only limited by their imaginations," said Ms. Bemis, who runs the Florida-based membership organization that helps nurses become entrepreneurs."
http://pittsburgh.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/stories/2003/01/20/story2.html

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Sat, Jan. 18, 2003: Pennsylvania: Hospital threatens lockout:"If registered nurses move forward with a Jan. 27 strike threat, Wilkes-Barre General Hospital officials have threatened to lock the nurses out of the hospital for more than a week. Go ahead and try, say the nurses, promising to look for jobs elsewhere during a lockout. Sandra Solovey, president of the Wyoming Valley Nurses Association, said some registered nurses have found jobs in the southern part of the state. "There is a nursing shortage," Solovey said. "I can have a job tomorrow."
http://www.timesleader.com/mld/timesleader/news/4974911.htm

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Sunday, January 5, 2003: Pennsylvania: Mercy woos students for nursing jobs:"Patty Stakel is looking for a career. The 29-year-old Mt. Washington woman, who now works part time at a flower shop, has been a flight attendant and an administrative assistant. But when her boyfriend, Ted Wallace, was hospitalized with appendicitis two years ago at Mercy Hospital, Uptown, Stakel saw a vocation that offered her more than just a paycheck. "Everything else is pretty much a job," said Stakel, one of about a dozen people on hand for an open house Saturday at the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing."
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/news/s_111170.html

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Saturday, December 07, 2002: Pennsylvania: Home-based nursing agency takes off for local LPN:"It all started four years ago with a simple idea. With the nursing shortage becoming a greater issue, Maggie Fortna decided to start her own business and run a nursing agency out of her home. After investing a lot of time and hard work, Hands-On Nursing has prospered beyond Fortna's wildest dreams. An addition to her 2035 Weavertown Road home that will serve as an office was recently completed. The office also serves as a measuring stick for how far the business has come: as many as 40 active nurses are referred out of the agency, and last year, a full-time human resources manager, Nicole Shifflett, was hired. Fortna celebrated her good fortune two weeks ago with a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new office. "It's really flourishing," said Fortna, who worked as an LPN before starting the business."< br> http://www.ldnews.com/Stories/0,1413,139%257E10140%257E1036538,00.html

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November 19, 2002: Pennsylvania, Harrisburg: Nurses' publicity stunt backs minimum-staffing legislation:"A group of registered nurses packed an ambulance bound for Harrisburg yesterday with 10,000 post cards signed by their peers calling for mandatory minimum staffing levels in Pennsylvania's hospitals. The goal of the publicity stunt conducted at the Pittsburgh Hilton and Towers, Downtown, was to persuade state legislators to pass separate bills that would establish minimum hospital staffing levels and ban mandatory overtime for health-care workers except in declared emergencies."
http://www.post-gazette.com/businessnews/20021120nurses1120p3.asp

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November 17, 2002: Pennsylvania: Nurse no one?:"The solutions are simple: Find more nurses for the future and keep the ones in practice now, experts said. Ideas so simple in theory, but difficult in execution as legislatures, schools and hospitals are all combining efforts to tackle the nationwide nursing shortage."
http://www.dailylocal.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=6092185&BRD=1671&PAG=461&dept_id=17782&rfi=6

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Wednesday, October 30, 2002: Pennsylvania: Area nurses believe staffing is adequate:"They question some findings of a study that found patient mortality higher after surgery when there are more patients to care for. Area hospitals say they consider how sick patients are when they determine the ratio of nurses to patients, and that ratio can vary from one nurse per patient to one nurse for seven patients. Whether such ratios determine a post-surgical patient's chances of surviving was part of a recently released study, which looked at 168 hospitals across the state. The study by the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing found patients have a greater risk of dying after surgery when nurses have more patients to care for. The study also found a heavier workload meant nurses were more likely to be burned out and unhappy with their jobs."
http://www.phillyburbs.com/intelligencerrecord/article1.asp?F_num=1730144

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October 29, 2002: Pennsylvania: Nursing shortage strains local hospitals:"Facing an unprecedented shortage of nurses, area hospital officials say the ratio of nurses to patients and the care that each patient receives is not impacted. A recent study, though, shows that mortality rates escalate with fewer nurses on staff."
http://www.phillyburbs.com/couriertimes/news/news/1029nursingload.htm

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Tuesday, October 15, 2002, Pennsylvania, NCC battles nursing shortages:"Scott said community colleges educate 60 percent of the nation's nurses, and NCC graduates represent a significant portion of area health care workers. NCC has partnered with local hospitals to design its nursing programs in a way that would cater to their needs, Scott said. Last year NCC created a sonography program in response to local need. The hospitals contribute tuition for some students in all health care programs and equipment and lab sites for the students to apply their knowledge."
http://pennlive.com/news/expresstimes/pa/index.ssf?/base/news-2/1034672762108640.xml

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June 6, 2002: Pennsylvania: LGH Nursing Program Hits All-Time High New Nurses To Help Ease Nursing Shortage:"People in the health care field are hoping that increased enrollment at nursing schools will help ease the nursing shortage in the Susquehanna Valley and around the country. At Lancaster General Hospital's college of nursing and health services the number of nursing students has more than doubled in the last two years."
http://www.thewgalchannel.com/news/1500263/detail.html

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February 15, 2002: Pennsylvania: HACC Gets Grant To Train Nurses, $600,000 Will Pay For Training At Local Hospitals:"Gov. Mark Schweiker Friday awarded Harrisburg Area Community College with $600,000 to train more nurses. The funds are part of $25 million to be given out this year to help people who've lost their jobs get back to work. The grant that will pay for training at local hospitals. The hope is that the money will bring in much needed workers to a field that's struggling with a shortage."
http://www.thewgalchannel.com/news/1238314/detail.html

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November 18, 2001: Pennsylvania, Pottstown, Agencies screen aides to prevent problems:"Lynn Jackson, prior to her recent arrest on theft and other charges, was employed as a home health aide in the Pottstown area. Jackson used her employment as a way to access the homes and valuables of at least two elderly West Pottsgrove women, according to police."
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=2659197&BRD=1674&PAG=461&dept_id=18041&rfi=6

Categories: Nursing News, Nursing Shortage

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Sunday, November 18, 2001: Pennsylvania: Recruiters traveling to fill nursing shortage:"With fears that a nursing shortage could affect patient care, some local hospitals are looking overseas to fill vacancies. Recruiters from West Penn Allegheny Health System, whose flagship facilities are Allegheny General on the North Side . . ."
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/news/s_4517.html

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See also:

National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc.:"The following narratives have been written by individual state boards of nursing regarding the significant activities in their respective states related to the nursing shortage. These excerpts do not provide a comprehensive update of the nurse shortage in these states or nationwide. The information is simply intended to share information among Member Boards."
National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc.
676 N. St. Clair Street Suite 550 Chicago, Illinois, 60611-2921
Telephone: (312) 787-6555. info@ncsbn.org
http://www.ncsbn.org/news/stateupdates_state_shortage.asp

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