Nursing & Healthcare Directories on: The Nursefriendly
Male Nurses, Men In Nursing

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Top 10 Qualities of a Great Nurse, NursingLink.com:"Nurses are pretty amazing. Great nurses aren’t just compassionate and kind — they have all the medical smarts of a doctor too! Plus, a career as a nurse offers a sense of personal satisfaction that you just can’t beat."
http://nursinglink.monster.com/benefits/articles/5019-top-10-qualities-of-a-great-nurse

Categories:
Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs), http://www.4nursing.com/apn
Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVNs), http://www.nursefriendly.com/lpn
Male Nurses, Men In Nursing, http://www.nursefriendly.com/male/
Nursing Profession, About The, http://www.nursefriendly.com/profession
Registered Nurses (RNs)http://www.nursefriendly.com/rn/
Traits & Qualities That Make Nurses Excellent Entrepreneurs, http://www.nursingentrepreneurs.com/qualities
Traveling Nurses, Travel Nursing Agencies, http://www.4travelnursing.com

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100 Networks and Resources for Male Nurses, July 16th, 2008, By Laura Milligan:"Male nurses have to fight stereotypes and discrimination every day just to get the same training and professional experiences as female nurses. To help you find support, inspiration, academic programs and professional leads, we’ve compiled a list of 100 different networks and useful resources just for male nurses."
http://www.nursingschoolsearch.com/blog/2008/07/100-networks-and-resources-for-male-nurses/

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Discuss Male Nurses In Our Forums

    Being A Male Nurse, Nursingdiscussions.com:"Is anyone on-line a Male Nurse, or know someone who is? I am a 35-year old male starting school in September working towards being an RN. I was wondering if anyone has had any problems/issues working in a predominately female profession. Any help would be great?"

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MaleNurseMagazine.com:"Welcome to MaleNurseMagazine.com. This website represents one of the corner stones to a growing list of resources that are dedicated to men in nursing. The next phase of our project will be the publication of the print version of our magazine. This site and its sister resources are not intended to create a gender gap or bias, rather our objectives are clear and simple: Why in this time of nursing shortage and high unemployment, do men make up only six percent of the nursing population How nursing educational programs can be enhanced to increase the number of male students being recruited Exploring issues that are of concern to men in nursing and strategies to address these issues."
Jerry R Lucas, RN
10510 South State Hwy 3
Deputy, IN 47230
Phone: 812-352-1293 cell: 812-701-9014
Jerry.RN@verizon.net
http://www.malenursemagazine.com/

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Men at work, Center for Nursing Advocacy: Is "Scrubs" hurting or helping male nurses?:"The January 30 episode of the popular NBC show "Scrubs" guest starred Rick Schroeder as hunky nurse Paul Flowers, who catches the eye of physician Elliot Reed (Sarah Chalke). But when Elliot discovers that Paul is a nurse and not a physician, she is mortified, as are her physician colleagues, who mock her mercilessly for seeing a "murse" who does "women's work." Some might take offense at the comic mileage the show gets out of these slurs, but the episode also shows its contempt for those who utter them. The anti-male nurse bigots are portrayed as idiots, while Paul is smart, witty, secure, and fearless, the rare "Scrubs" character without Titanic-sized flaws. In general, "Scrubs," like other current Hollywood shows, shows nursing as a low-skilled profession--focusing on things like bedpan duty, as this episode does. And it suffers from the common "Marcus Welby Syndrome", in which physicians are shown providing all meaningful health care. But the show should be applauded, at least based on this episode, for introducing a nurse character with the above attributes and addressing the issue of bias against male nurses in a generally constructive way. Schroeder is also set to appear in the February 20 episode. "Scrubs" usually airs on NBC Thursdays at 8:30/7:30 C. However, the February 20 episode is scheduled to air at 9:30/8:30C."
The Center for Nursing Advocacy
203 Churchwardens Rd. Baltimore, Maryland (MD) 21212-2937 USA
Phone: 410.323.1100 Fax: 443.705.0260
media-alert@nursingadvocacy.org
http://www.nursingadvocacy.org/news/2003jan30_scrubs.html

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MedZilla Asks: "Why Are There So Few Male Nurses?" June 6, 2002:"Author and Pulitzer Prize winner Susan Faludi wrote in her book Stiffed about men being at the mercy of cultural forces that disfigure their lives and destroy their happiness. Enter men in nursing, where men are but a small fraction-5.7% according to the latest statistics-of a female-run workforce, and little seems to be changing. "Men are not encouraged to go into nursing, and, for the most part, the male population is overlooked by the profession," says Frank Heasley, PhD, president and CEO, MedZilla, a leading Internet recruitment and professional community that targets jobseekers and HR Professionals in biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, healthcare and science."
http://www.medzilla.com/press61102.html

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Medzilla Asks: Is Affirmative Action Required in the Nursing field? June 25, 2002:"Luther Christman, PhD, RN, had already begun his fight for diversity in nursing when he was dean of nursing at Vanderbilt University in the 1950s and '60s. The first male dean in a United States nursing school, Dr. Christman employed black women as faculty at Vanderbilt for the first time. He also was recruiting men into nursing. "I made arrangements with the Pentagon to refer all the names to me of people being discharged in the southern area of the country who had been medical corps men for their four years in the armed forces. I thought they'd be a good group to recruit from because they're already oriented toward care," he says."
http://www.medzilla.com/press62502.html

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Men In Nursing, Minoritynurse.com:"However, that was almost 40 years ago, some may argue. Certainly the bias and prejudices toward men in nursing that existed at that time no longer exist. Right? Wrong, according to Gene Tranbarger, Ed.D., R.N., CNAA, associate professor of nursing at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. “Open discrimination against men is fast disappearing from schools of nursing but remains imbedded in the school fabric,” he observes. “The faculty still relies on feminine pronouns when discussing nurses. Male nurses who wish to work in obstetrics/gynecology still face obstacles and often have to resort to legal remedies.”
http://www.minoritynurse.com/features/nurse_emp/08-30-00c.html

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A few good men, Nurseweek:"About 6 percent of nurses today are male. But while the discriminatory practices against men nursing might be easing, male nurses continue to tell stories about unfair treatment."
http://www.nurseweek.com/news/features/01-05/men.html

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Men in American Nursing History:"The purpose of these pages is to provide an overview of the history of men in nursing with an emphasis on men in the Americas. The word "nurse" was not used until the thirteenth century. It originated from the Latin term to nurture. Translations of non-English works prior to the early 1900's typically used the term "nurse" when referring to male health care providers. More recent translations use the term "attendant," because it was thought that only females could be "nurses." These pages will use the term "nurse"."
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/6011/

Workplace Violence, Nursingdiscussions.com:"In a unit I work in, a Doctor had attacked a male nurse. The doctor had arrived to the unit angry and "running his mouth" how nobody knows what they are doing. When actuary a family dr. sent a patient by car to the hospital with chest pain. The patient was having a MI. The doctor in this case is a cardiologist who was consulted. Any ways, a nurse walked up to the dr and said, " I guess this ones going to the cath lab. All at once the dr jumped from the chair, grabbed the nurse by the throat choking him. This action was in front of the patient and many visitors."
http://Nursingdiscussions.com/ ******************************************************

Monday, February 28, 2005: A male nurse's perspective:"The debate surrounding gender in the medical field is highly sensitive and controversial. But when most people think about the inequalities within the sciences, they tend to forget that the odds can be stacked against men, too. Right here at Boston College, a small group of men is venturing into a field largely dominated by women - nursing. Male nurses are few and far between within the halls of Cushing, but they are successful in their endeavors to break the gender barriers, and they are leaving their mark on their fellow nurses-in-training."
http://www.bcheights.com/media/paper144/news/2005/02/28/Features/A.Male.Nurses.Perspective-879090.shtml

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October 21, 2004: 2005 Georgia Men in Nursing Calendar:"In Georgia, with males making up just 5% of the nursing profession, we want to grow the next crop of nurses by recruiting more men. The Georgia Statewide AHEC Network went searching for male nurses and male nursing students to appear in the 2005 Georgia Men in Nursing Calendar. This calendar can be used to promote recruitment of men into the profession. It showcases the reasons males become nurses, their varied scope of practice settings, and why others may want to choose this career path. Not only does the calendar emphasize professional experiences of male nurses, but it also highlights their personal accomplishments, hobbies, and education."
http://www.threeriversahec.org/05nurscal.htm

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August 27, 2003: Men at Work, Nurseweek Magazine:"Thanks in part to campaigns designed to appeal to masculine sensibilities, more men are entering nursing—and discovering the joys of a profession traditionally dominated by women."
http://www.nurseweek.com/news/features/03-08/manenough.asp

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Sept. 6, 2002, Philadelphia, Is There A Male Nurse In The House?:"(AP) Recent graduates of the nation's nursing schools are leaving the profession more quickly than their predecessors, with male nurses bolting at almost twice the rate of their female counterparts, according to a new study. About 7.5 percent of new male nurses left the profession within four years of graduating from nursing school, compared to 4.1 percent of new female nurses, according to the study by a University of Pennsylvania researcher. It was reported Thursday in the journal Health Affairs."
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/09/06/health/main521057.shtml

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